A True Healthcare Market?


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There are many small fixes that can help repair the market for healthcare and health insurance – a market that has been seriously distorted for the past 30+ years. This article hits on the basic principle that catastrophes need a functioning insurance market based on actuarial probabilities, but healthcare maintenance is something we all need to SAVE for. Health savings accounts are a necessary component that the ACA attempts to excise. Why?

From Barron’s:

Unmanaged Competition

By THOMAS G. DONLAN

Making health care into a real economy

A reader recently asked, “If the Affordable Care Act isn’t the answer, what is?” Another asked, “Do you really want a health-insurance system without government regulation?” These are fair questions. We have found problems with the new health-care law—both operational and philosophical—to be so compelling that even the status quo ante seems preferable, but we also have a better vision.

Neither a benevolent dictator nor an army of bureaucrats can create an ideal system that serves all possible buyers of health care and properly rewards all who provide it. Only independent individuals can operate in a market, deciding what to buy and what to sell, finding prices that clear the market.

But a market cannot work when third parties stand over the supplier and the customer to fix prices or supplies. So the first element of a good U.S. health-care system must be that all Americans must purchase their own health-insurance policy.

Unlike Obamacare, this mandate should leave lots of room for competition and choice.

Limited Choice

Nearly all health care in the U.S. is paid for by third parties—government, employers, insurance companies—who have neither the provider’s nor the customer’s interests at heart. Individual choice is deliberately limited for the convenience of the real payers.

So the second element of a good U.S. health-care system must be that the citizens must make choices for themselves. Price and scope of coverage are the consumers’ business, not their government’s.

Health insurance is too complicated to be left to policy makers, and if we have a real market, the business will be even more complicated because every insurance company—and new ones—will create more policies tailored to the consumers’ various preferences. In a free market for health insurance, we will have at least as many different styles of health insurance as there are flavors and prices of canned soup in the supermarket.

Insurance, like banking and other potential Ponzi schemes, does need government auditing and supervision, to ensure soundness but not to limit variety.

The current U.S. health-care system is parsimonious. Americans are fearfully aware that their health-insurance coverage may have holes and that they won’t know where the holes are until it’s too late. Some procedures may be excluded from coverage; some health-care providers won’t accept certain types of insurance. Hospitals and doctors do not compete on price; many don’t disclose their inflated official prices, except on the bills; few if any disclose the discounts they offer to the real payers.

Many doctors refuse to accept patients covered by the two biggest government programs, Medicare and Medicaid, both of which have arcane systems for setting what they will pay, regardless of providers’ billed prices.

On the other hand, the U.S. health-care system is not just parsimonious; it is also notoriously wasteful. Insurers, including the government Medicare plan, carefully define what services they will pay for and arrange with providers how much they will pay, but they do almost nothing to limit the number of allowable services they will pay for. Providers living under price fixing make it up on volume.

Plentiful Funds

We often hear that the health-care industry constitutes one-sixth of the U.S. economy, heading for 25% of the economy as the population ages. Less frequently are we reminded that the federal government’s taxpayers and lenders are already paying for half of health-care expenditures. Almost never does anyone note that the federal government’s per capita expenditures on health care for about half its citizens are enough to run a universal health-care system like that in the United Kingdom.

We should not want a government care system filled with problems like the U.K. system; the point is that the current U.S. health-care system already has more than enough money sloshing around to provide excellent care for all Americans.

So the third element of a good U.S. health-care system is to subject health-care to the discipline of consumer discretion.

David Goldhill, CEO of GSN, the cable-TV-network company, is the author of a terrific recent book on the American system: Catastrophic Care: How American Health Care Killed My Father—And How We Can Fix It. Most of the book is devoted to the ills of the current system, which Goldhill sums up as, “All of us are spending insane amounts of money, yet the system makes us feel like paupers.” The health-care industry has hardly any accountability to the customer, and thus it offers terrible service, high prices, limitations on supply of doctors and hospitals, excessive errors, underinvestment in information technology, and lack of coordinated care.

Readers will be encouraged to jettison the current payment systems and the current payers, perhaps to take up these reforms:

Market Power
  1. Employers should not be allowed to provide health insurance, and the federal government should provide direct subsidies only for low-income consumers.
  2. High-deductible catastrophic insurance should be encouraged, not limited. That would lower premiums so that citizens could create Medical Savings Accounts for most of their routine care. Those too poor for this system should receive government subsidies for their insurance premiums and their savings deposits, putting them on the same footing as other citizens when they choose their providers of health care and health insurance.
  3. Medical underwriting should be encouraged, not outlawed, with those who are uninsurable participating in assigned-risk pools subsidized by the federal government.
  4. There could also be a direct subsidy to providers, by which the government would pay a percentage of every bill for every payer with income less than the median income. The share should be significant but not so large that patients would lose their price sensitivity and their incentive to shop.

The essence of our health-care system has been to confuse everyone into thinking they have control without paying for it. In health care as in other things, if we pay for what we get, we may get what we pay for.

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